OpenStack Installation – Taking Packstack as an example (Part 1)

OpenStack Installation – Taking Packstack as an example (Part 1)

When installing OpenStack, it is a common problem when deciding which version to use, how to install it and other various technicalities. During the early days, many of these were installed manually, but these methods are too time consuming. If you wish to learn about the various service of OpenStack, you can still do it this way, but using automated tools will save a lot of time.

This process can be achieved through several ways:

-Devstack

-Packstack

-Saltstack

If using the commercial version, the following can be used:

-Suse OpenStack Cloud 7

-Redhat OpenStack Platform 12

There are a lot more available tools and versions of the software that are available to be used, as long as there is someone who is maintaining them. But in these scenarios, the deployment tool DevStack will need to be used. DevStack is mainly used to develop OpenStack services, not really suited for online environments. Usually when you get started, it’s easy to encounter setbacks like version issues, environment parameters, etc. You will need to keep an eye out when getting started.

When choosing the version for your needs, pay attention to what subsequent maintenance will be like. OpenStack is an open source software that continues to grow everyday. Anyone can download the code, modify it, add new features, but with the vast amount of input, wouldn’t that just make a mess of things? It does, which is why we develop according to the specifications of the OpenStack Foundation. If you don’t adjust your code according to the Foundation’s specifications, the following problems will occur.

-No Maintenance

-Unable to upgrade version

-Incompatible with other third-party software

Because of this, the OpenStack Foundation provides an authentication mechanism. If the version has been customized, as long as it passes the certifications, fewer questions will be asked. The certified version will either get a POWERED or COMPATIBLE certification upon approval, which you can choose.

When installing Packstack, you can change the environment through configuration files, or use it as a multi-computing node. Additionally, you can connect other storage devices. The small scale environment makes it quite convenient to use. However, we will need to distinguish the following roles, specifications, and common service locations (DNS, NTP).

-Controller

CPU: 4 core

RAM: 16 GB RAM

DISK: 20 GB

IP: 192.168.122.31

Netmask: 255.255.255.0

Gateway: 192.168.122.1

DNS: 8.8.8.8

-Compute1

CPU: 4 core

RAM: 8 GB RAM

DISK: 20 GB

IP: 192.168.122.32

Netmask: 255.255.255.0

Gateway: 192.168.122.1

DNS: 8.8.8.8

-Compute2

CPU: 4 core

RAM: 8 GB RAM

DISK: 20 GB

IP: 192.168.122.33

Netmask: 255.255.255.0

Gateway: 192.168.122.1

DNS: 8.8.8.8

-NTP: clock.stdtime.gov.tw

-OS: Centos 7

Base Environment: Infrastructure Server

The operating system installation process is not covered here, do not install minimal install when using Centos 7. It is easy to have missing kit problems during the installation. After you install the login system, we will need to specify the host name and update system.

Specifying host name

Specifying IP location


After using NetworkManager to complete the IP operation, we will need to close NetworkManager. After executing the three commands, use the old network commands restart the network. At this time, the network will be disconnected, but if the settings are correct, you will be able to use the new network. You can use the new IP to login, if there is a problem, you will need to set the correct configurations for the host.

Log in to the host again to confirm the IP location and host name

Create a host key (ssh-keygen)

To be continued

延伸閱讀:OpenStack Installation – Taking Packstack as an example (Part 2)

撰文: 陳彥勝 迎棧科技資深解決方案架構師

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